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Women/Trans/Femme Introduction to Welding Mig/Tig+Torch Cutting

Instructor: Cory Gabrielle

August 24, 2019

Starts: 9:00 AM
Ends: 2:00 PM

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This course is open to members and non-members and uses a sliding scale fee. You can read Alexis J Cunningfolk's explanation of sliding scale as a tool of economic justice to learn more! 



Intro to Mig/Tig Welding and Torch Cutting 

**This class is for people who identify as Women/Trans/Femme**

Join us for an introductory course in basic welding with a focus on Mig (Metal Inert Gas) and TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding, with an additional section on torch cutting (a deeply satisfying tool for stress reduction and practicality). Participants will learn foundational welding tools, get acquainted with the Hack Factory, and be able to take home some spiffy welds. We'll be practicing on both plate and sheet steel, work with a bandsaw, chop saw, and ironworker. 

This is a five-hour class, participants will be get an outline of the day with designated breaks, and people should feel free to opt in and out as works for them. 

What We Provide  

The Hack Factory has PPE (personal protective equipment) including  auto-darkening hoods (enough for everyone!), welding jackets, safety glasses, and gloves. You're welcome to bring your own PPE as well.

A Note on the Space and Accessibility 

The Hack Factory is located in Seward on 26th and 31st. There is ample parking available, a bus route on 31st, and bike racks to lock to outside. There are three shallow steps to the front door and two more steps into the shop floor space. The floors are concrete, so wear comfortable shoes you can stand in. There is seating available but may not work when you're welding.  

There is a classroom space that's air-conditioned with comfy chairs and water. There is not a fridge space for food. 

A Note on how Sliding Scale Works 

Alexis J. Cunningfolk has a wonderful article that talks more about how and why sliding scale fees are used that I enthusiasitcally reccommend people check out. I chose to use sliding scale because I believe access to information and experiences is important, and I am trying to also work towards a more economically just world.  A quote from the article sums it up; 

"The sliding scale is a tool that allows for a product or service to be obtained at multiple price points based on the circumstances of the purchaser. 

As Alexis J. Cunningfolk puts in the essay (seriously, read it, it's great), the top end of the class price is the true cost of the class, for folks who have access to financial security. The middle price is for folks for whom the true cost would be limiting but have access to financial capital and have their basic needs met. The bottom cost is an effort to make the class a little more accessible to people for whom the top or middle tier would mean not being able to buy groceries or other basic needs. 

**I'm happy to work with folks on payment plans or potential for lower cost options for folks who are not able to make the lower cost option, please email metalshop@tcmaker.com!**

Below is a graphic made by Alexis J Cunningfolk to give the sliding scale idea an illustration! 

Sliding Scale Fee